Category Archives: TravelTransportation

Garuda pilots end strike

Pilots with state-run carrier Garuda Indonesia cut short their 24-hour strike Thursday after company officials agreed to reopen negotiations over pay and working conditions.

Pudjobroto, a spokesman for the airline, said he hoped the two sides could reach a satisfactory agreement before the end of August.
The 600-strong Garuda’s Pilot Association called the strike — which lasted only half a day — after local pilots complained they earned 30 percent less than the carrier’s foreign pilots.
“We just want to be heard,” said Capt. Stephanus Geraldus, the union’s chairman. “Not only are we underpaid, we’re overworked.”
“The board of directors should know all this undermines safety.”
It was not immediately clear how many pilots took part in the strike.
Geraldus said 500 initially agreed to join in, but many were convinced to return to the skies by early Thursday.

Read more: http://newsok.com/pilots-end-strike-at-indonesias-state-run-airline/article/feed/279971#ixzz1TO4ZA1MC

Garuda pilots end strike

Pilots with state-run carrier Garuda Indonesia cut short their 24-hour strike Thursday after company officials agreed to reopen negotiations over pay and working conditions.

Pudjobroto, a spokesman for the airline, said he hoped the two sides could reach a satisfactory agreement before the end of August.
The 600-strong Garuda’s Pilot Association called the strike — which lasted only half a day — after local pilots complained they earned 30 percent less than the carrier’s foreign pilots.
“We just want to be heard,” said Capt. Stephanus Geraldus, the union’s chairman. “Not only are we underpaid, we’re overworked.”
“The board of directors should know all this undermines safety.”
It was not immediately clear how many pilots took part in the strike.
Geraldus said 500 initially agreed to join in, but many were convinced to return to the skies by early Thursday.

Read more: http://newsok.com/pilots-end-strike-at-indonesias-state-run-airline/article/feed/279971#ixzz1TO4ZA1MC

ITB Plans Traditional Design for a World-Class Soekarno-Hatta Airport

Indonesian cultural practices and traditional designs shall influence and mark the construction and expansion plans for the Soekarno-Hatta International Airport, state airport operator PT Angkasa Pura II pointed out on Monday. The grand design for expansion plans is being drafted out by a team of architects from the Bandung Institute of Technology, or ITB.

“However, services offered by the airport shall be modern and will live up to the terms of a world-class airport,” Angkasa Pura II president director Tri Sunoko said.
Work to turn Indonesia’s Soekarno-Hatta International Airport into a world-class international gateway by 2014 will begin early next year, initially with the drafting of the grand design. State airport operator Angkasa Pura II’s finance director Laurensius Manurung earlier said that Rp 11.7 trillion would be spent on the overhaul. The plans include expanding the airport’s Terminal 3 and integrating Terminals 1 and 2. Tri Sunoko pointed out that it was hoped in the immediate years to come, the airport would be able to accommodate 62 million passengers.
Terminal 3, for instance, will be developed into a U-shaped building which can accommodate all of the passengers’ operational activities, such as passenger services, baggage handling, transit passenger services, transfer passenger services, and commercial facilities.

Source: Tempointeractive

Indonesia likely to become East Asia auto parts industry base

The inceasingly bright growth prospects of Indonesia`s automotive market are boosting the government`s belief that the country can eventually become a car parts industry base for East Asia, chief economic minister Hatta Rajasa said.

“If we consistently entertain the idea that Indonesia is an ideal place for automotive companies to base their car parts industries in, and continue to maintain our automotive market growth, it is not impossible that in the not too distant future our automotive industry will become the biggest not only in Southeast Asia but East Asia,” the coordinating minister for economic affairs said here on Friday.

He made the statement in his address opening the 19th Indonesia International Motor Show (IIMS) 2011.

But Indonesia could become a strong automotive parts industry base in the world and maintain its bargaining position as such only if it could forge a good connectivity between automotive and infrastructure industries, heighten efficiency at production levels and ensure the continuity of industrial feed stock supply lines, he said.

“Therefore, cooperation is needed between business and the government. This is good for the self-reliance and resilience of our automotive industry,” he said.

Hatta also said Indonesia should draw maximum benefit from its present position as the chair of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and as the coordinator of the integration of the automotive sectors of ASEAN member countries – an area being prioritized in the formation of an ASEAN Economic Community by 2015.

“This is a good momentum for Indonesia to accelerate its automotive industry development,” he said.

Meanwhile, Bambang Trisulo, chairman of the advisory council of the Association of Indonesian Automotive Industries (Gaikindo), said he was optimistic Indonesia could become a strong automotive parts industry base for East Asia.

“I believe for 80 percent that we can achieve it so long as we can carry out what Hatta has outlined,” Bambang told ANTARA.

He said Japan as the biggest automotive producer in Asia had become more aware of the risks of keeping its car parts industry in Japan following the recent earthquake and tsunami there and might relocate its production facilities to Indonesia.

Another country that was eyeing Indonesia as a possible base for its auto parts industry was South Korea, and so was China, according to Bambang

Private Vehicle Premium Ban May Start in September

The government may prevent private vehicles from using Premium, the low-octane subsidized gasoline, in an effort to curb the surging costs of fuel subsidies.

Energy Ministry official Evita Legowo said on Thursday that the ban may be imposed after Idul Fitri, which comes at the end of next month. The ban was planned for last year but was delayed.

Now the government may have little choice but to introduce it after the House of Representatives Budget Committee approved a subsidized fuel quota lower than that proposed in this year’s revised budget.

This means a method of limiting subsidized fuel consumption is necessary, Evita said.

“I hope we start curbing Premium usage this year instead of next year,” she said. “The sooner the better.”

The House approved a subsidized fuel quota of 40.5 million kiloliters, less than the 42 million kiloliters proposed by the downstream oil and gas regulator, BPH Migas, which supervises subsidized fuels including Premium, diesel and kerosene.

Indonesia to make World’s Cheapest Car

The world’s cheapest car, the Nano produced by Indian carmaker Tata Motors, is likely to be manufactured in Indonesia, a report said on Monday.

The Bangkok Post reported that Indonesia had appeared to win out over Thailand as the production base for the vehicle.

The newspaper, quoting an unnamed source, said that as Indonesia had “offered more attractive incentives, Tata decided to shelve the expansion plan in Thailand.”

Reasons included Thailand’s lack of political stability and automobile tax structures.

The Post reported that Tata was hoping to produce 50,000 Nanos a year at a plant in Jakarta from 2013.

“It plans to export the cars to Thailand, Malaysia and the Philippines as it is banking on their large populations and big demand for low-cost cars.”

New Airport X-Ray Rule Halted After Cargo Chaos

Amid scenes of chaos at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport’s cargo terminal where freight piled up as courier employees picketed outside, the government made a hasty U-turn and agreed to delay implementation of a new regulation that caused the trouble.

The government, courier firms and state airport operator Angkasa Pura II agreed on Tuesday evening to postpone the policy on cargo processing — which included a massive hike in charges to inspect goods — until August at the earliest.

“We held a meeting with government officials and we agreed to resolve the case. There will be no more strike,” said M. Kadrial, chairman of the Indonesian Express Delivery Companies Association (Asperindo).

Hundreds of representatives from courier and expedition firms had protested since Monday, when the regulation, which was issued in April, took effect.

Among the demonstrators’ complaints was the government’s appointment of only three designated companies that were allowed to charge the couriers a higher inspection fee based on the weight of cargo. “The inspection tariff will be returned to the previous tariff until August 16,’’ Kadrial said.

The security charge — which couriers, importers and exporters must pay to the government — was raised more than 14-fold to
Rp 850 (10 cents) per kilogram from Rp 60.

The rise in costs reflected the need to tack a security label on goods that passed inspection, according to the companies.
Critics of the new policy issued by the Transportation Ministry said it had made the process of inspecting and loading cargo at the airport more laborious because it limited the number of accredited inspectors.

Bambang Ervan, a spokesman for the Transportation Ministry, said the regulation also allowed freight costs — separate from inspection tariffs — to be hiked to Rp 250,000 a kilo from Rp 60,000.

New Airport X-Ray Rule Halted After Cargo Chaos

Amid scenes of chaos at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport’s cargo terminal where freight piled up as courier employees picketed outside, the government made a hasty U-turn and agreed to delay implementation of a new regulation that caused the trouble.

The government, courier firms and state airport operator Angkasa Pura II agreed on Tuesday evening to postpone the policy on cargo processing — which included a massive hike in charges to inspect goods — until August at the earliest.

“We held a meeting with government officials and we agreed to resolve the case. There will be no more strike,” said M. Kadrial, chairman of the Indonesian Express Delivery Companies Association (Asperindo).

Hundreds of representatives from courier and expedition firms had protested since Monday, when the regulation, which was issued in April, took effect.

Among the demonstrators’ complaints was the government’s appointment of only three designated companies that were allowed to charge the couriers a higher inspection fee based on the weight of cargo. “The inspection tariff will be returned to the previous tariff until August 16,’’ Kadrial said.

The security charge — which couriers, importers and exporters must pay to the government — was raised more than 14-fold to
Rp 850 (10 cents) per kilogram from Rp 60.

The rise in costs reflected the need to tack a security label on goods that passed inspection, according to the companies.
Critics of the new policy issued by the Transportation Ministry said it had made the process of inspecting and loading cargo at the airport more laborious because it limited the number of accredited inspectors.

Bambang Ervan, a spokesman for the Transportation Ministry, said the regulation also allowed freight costs — separate from inspection tariffs — to be hiked to Rp 250,000 a kilo from Rp 60,000.

New Airport X-Ray Rule Halted After Cargo Chaos

Amid scenes of chaos at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport’s cargo terminal where freight piled up as courier employees picketed outside, the government made a hasty U-turn and agreed to delay implementation of a new regulation that caused the trouble.

The government, courier firms and state airport operator Angkasa Pura II agreed on Tuesday evening to postpone the policy on cargo processing — which included a massive hike in charges to inspect goods — until August at the earliest.

“We held a meeting with government officials and we agreed to resolve the case. There will be no more strike,” said M. Kadrial, chairman of the Indonesian Express Delivery Companies Association (Asperindo).

Hundreds of representatives from courier and expedition firms had protested since Monday, when the regulation, which was issued in April, took effect.

Among the demonstrators’ complaints was the government’s appointment of only three designated companies that were allowed to charge the couriers a higher inspection fee based on the weight of cargo. “The inspection tariff will be returned to the previous tariff until August 16,’’ Kadrial said.

The security charge — which couriers, importers and exporters must pay to the government — was raised more than 14-fold to
Rp 850 (10 cents) per kilogram from Rp 60.

The rise in costs reflected the need to tack a security label on goods that passed inspection, according to the companies.
Critics of the new policy issued by the Transportation Ministry said it had made the process of inspecting and loading cargo at the airport more laborious because it limited the number of accredited inspectors.

Bambang Ervan, a spokesman for the Transportation Ministry, said the regulation also allowed freight costs — separate from inspection tariffs — to be hiked to Rp 250,000 a kilo from Rp 60,000.

New Airport X-Ray Rule Halted After Cargo Chaos

Amid scenes of chaos at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport’s cargo terminal where freight piled up as courier employees picketed outside, the government made a hasty U-turn and agreed to delay implementation of a new regulation that caused the trouble.

The government, courier firms and state airport operator Angkasa Pura II agreed on Tuesday evening to postpone the policy on cargo processing — which included a massive hike in charges to inspect goods — until August at the earliest.

“We held a meeting with government officials and we agreed to resolve the case. There will be no more strike,” said M. Kadrial, chairman of the Indonesian Express Delivery Companies Association (Asperindo).

Hundreds of representatives from courier and expedition firms had protested since Monday, when the regulation, which was issued in April, took effect.

Among the demonstrators’ complaints was the government’s appointment of only three designated companies that were allowed to charge the couriers a higher inspection fee based on the weight of cargo. “The inspection tariff will be returned to the previous tariff until August 16,’’ Kadrial said.

The security charge — which couriers, importers and exporters must pay to the government — was raised more than 14-fold to
Rp 850 (10 cents) per kilogram from Rp 60.

The rise in costs reflected the need to tack a security label on goods that passed inspection, according to the companies.
Critics of the new policy issued by the Transportation Ministry said it had made the process of inspecting and loading cargo at the airport more laborious because it limited the number of accredited inspectors.

Bambang Ervan, a spokesman for the Transportation Ministry, said the regulation also allowed freight costs — separate from inspection tariffs — to be hiked to Rp 250,000 a kilo from Rp 60,000.