Category Archives: SciTech

Anger Over Arrests of iPad Sellers

The Indonesian Police on Saturday came under sharp public criticism following the recent arrests of two students accused of selling iPads on an online forum without providing Indonesian manuals for the gadgets.

Both Dian Yudha Negara and Randy Lester Samu, students at the Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), were detained at Central Jakarta's Salemba Penitentiary, after police accused them of violating existing regulations for selling used iPads on Kaskus, an online forum, without providing Indonesian manuals.
Source: Tempointeractive
Blogger Enda Nasution pointed out the police had over-reacted.
"They [Dian and Randy] are just commoners. Not smugglers selling off hundreds of billions worth of [illegal] goods," Enda said.

Separately Indonesian movie director Joko Anwar voiced out his disapproval on the microblogging social Web site, Twitter. Under the key name #FreeDianRandy, which is slowly gaining popularity on the site, Joko tweeted: "New gadgets come out everyday, while the [existing] regulation was last updated 12 years ago. How can they get arrested for not providing manuals for iPads sold on Kaskus?"

Both Dian and Randy bought iPads when they vacationed in Singapore late last year, only to decide upon returning to Indonesia that they would rather sell these pricey gadgets off on Kaskus.

They ended up being contacted by a potential client and ended up meeting the man at City Walk Mall in Central Jakarta. The deal was a cash-on-delivery transaction, and involved two 64 gigabyte iPads and six 16 gigabyte iPads. The potential client happened to be none other than a police officer, who arrested them for selling off iPads without Indonesian manuals.

Anger Over Arrests of iPad Sellers

The Indonesian Police on Saturday came under sharp public criticism following the recent arrests of two students accused of selling iPads on an online forum without providing Indonesian manuals for the gadgets.

Both Dian Yudha Negara and Randy Lester Samu, students at the Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), were detained at Central Jakarta's Salemba Penitentiary, after police accused them of violating existing regulations for selling used iPads on Kaskus, an online forum, without providing Indonesian manuals.
Source: Tempointeractive
Blogger Enda Nasution pointed out the police had over-reacted.
"They [Dian and Randy] are just commoners. Not smugglers selling off hundreds of billions worth of [illegal] goods," Enda said.

Separately Indonesian movie director Joko Anwar voiced out his disapproval on the microblogging social Web site, Twitter. Under the key name #FreeDianRandy, which is slowly gaining popularity on the site, Joko tweeted: "New gadgets come out everyday, while the [existing] regulation was last updated 12 years ago. How can they get arrested for not providing manuals for iPads sold on Kaskus?"

Both Dian and Randy bought iPads when they vacationed in Singapore late last year, only to decide upon returning to Indonesia that they would rather sell these pricey gadgets off on Kaskus.

They ended up being contacted by a potential client and ended up meeting the man at City Walk Mall in Central Jakarta. The deal was a cash-on-delivery transaction, and involved two 64 gigabyte iPads and six 16 gigabyte iPads. The potential client happened to be none other than a police officer, who arrested them for selling off iPads without Indonesian manuals.

Anger Over Arrests of iPad Sellers

The Indonesian Police on Saturday came under sharp public criticism following the recent arrests of two students accused of selling iPads on an online forum without providing Indonesian manuals for the gadgets.

Both Dian Yudha Negara and Randy Lester Samu, students at the Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), were detained at Central Jakarta's Salemba Penitentiary, after police accused them of violating existing regulations for selling used iPads on Kaskus, an online forum, without providing Indonesian manuals.
Source: Tempointeractive
Blogger Enda Nasution pointed out the police had over-reacted.
"They [Dian and Randy] are just commoners. Not smugglers selling off hundreds of billions worth of [illegal] goods," Enda said.

Separately Indonesian movie director Joko Anwar voiced out his disapproval on the microblogging social Web site, Twitter. Under the key name #FreeDianRandy, which is slowly gaining popularity on the site, Joko tweeted: "New gadgets come out everyday, while the [existing] regulation was last updated 12 years ago. How can they get arrested for not providing manuals for iPads sold on Kaskus?"

Both Dian and Randy bought iPads when they vacationed in Singapore late last year, only to decide upon returning to Indonesia that they would rather sell these pricey gadgets off on Kaskus.

They ended up being contacted by a potential client and ended up meeting the man at City Walk Mall in Central Jakarta. The deal was a cash-on-delivery transaction, and involved two 64 gigabyte iPads and six 16 gigabyte iPads. The potential client happened to be none other than a police officer, who arrested them for selling off iPads without Indonesian manuals.

Anger Over Arrests of iPad Sellers

The Indonesian Police on Saturday came under sharp public criticism following the recent arrests of two students accused of selling iPads on an online forum without providing Indonesian manuals for the gadgets.

Both Dian Yudha Negara and Randy Lester Samu, students at the Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), were detained at Central Jakarta's Salemba Penitentiary, after police accused them of violating existing regulations for selling used iPads on Kaskus, an online forum, without providing Indonesian manuals.
Source: Tempointeractive
Blogger Enda Nasution pointed out the police had over-reacted.
"They [Dian and Randy] are just commoners. Not smugglers selling off hundreds of billions worth of [illegal] goods," Enda said.

Separately Indonesian movie director Joko Anwar voiced out his disapproval on the microblogging social Web site, Twitter. Under the key name #FreeDianRandy, which is slowly gaining popularity on the site, Joko tweeted: "New gadgets come out everyday, while the [existing] regulation was last updated 12 years ago. How can they get arrested for not providing manuals for iPads sold on Kaskus?"

Both Dian and Randy bought iPads when they vacationed in Singapore late last year, only to decide upon returning to Indonesia that they would rather sell these pricey gadgets off on Kaskus.

They ended up being contacted by a potential client and ended up meeting the man at City Walk Mall in Central Jakarta. The deal was a cash-on-delivery transaction, and involved two 64 gigabyte iPads and six 16 gigabyte iPads. The potential client happened to be none other than a police officer, who arrested them for selling off iPads without Indonesian manuals.

Anger Over Arrests of iPad Sellers

The Indonesian Police on Saturday came under sharp public criticism following the recent arrests of two students accused of selling iPads on an online forum without providing Indonesian manuals for the gadgets.

Both Dian Yudha Negara and Randy Lester Samu, students at the Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), were detained at Central Jakarta's Salemba Penitentiary, after police accused them of violating existing regulations for selling used iPads on Kaskus, an online forum, without providing Indonesian manuals.
Source: Tempointeractive
Blogger Enda Nasution pointed out the police had over-reacted.
"They [Dian and Randy] are just commoners. Not smugglers selling off hundreds of billions worth of [illegal] goods," Enda said.

Separately Indonesian movie director Joko Anwar voiced out his disapproval on the microblogging social Web site, Twitter. Under the key name #FreeDianRandy, which is slowly gaining popularity on the site, Joko tweeted: "New gadgets come out everyday, while the [existing] regulation was last updated 12 years ago. How can they get arrested for not providing manuals for iPads sold on Kaskus?"

Both Dian and Randy bought iPads when they vacationed in Singapore late last year, only to decide upon returning to Indonesia that they would rather sell these pricey gadgets off on Kaskus.

They ended up being contacted by a potential client and ended up meeting the man at City Walk Mall in Central Jakarta. The deal was a cash-on-delivery transaction, and involved two 64 gigabyte iPads and six 16 gigabyte iPads. The potential client happened to be none other than a police officer, who arrested them for selling off iPads without Indonesian manuals.

Indonesian Scientists Involved in Major Evolution Breakthrough: Report

Scientific excavations in Indonesia have revealed that modern humans never co-existed with Homo erectus — a finding counter to previous hypotheses of human evolution, New York University says.

The research, reported in the journal PLoS One, offers new insights into the nature of human evolution, suggesting a different role for Homo erectus than had been previously thought, the university says in a news release.

The work was conducted by the Solo River Terrace (SoRT) Project, an international group of scientists directed by anthropologists Etty Indriati of Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia and Susan Antón of New York University.

The release says Homo erectus is widely considered a direct human ancestor — it resembles modern humans in many respects, except for its smaller brain and differently shaped skull — and was the first of our ancestors to migrate out of Africa, approximately 1.8 million years ago.

Homo erectus became extinct in Africa and much of Asia by about 500,000 years ago, but appeared to have survived in Indonesia until about 35,000 to 50,000 years ago at the site of Ngandong on the Solo River.

These late members of Homo erectus would have shared the environment with early members of our own species, Homo sapiens, who arrived in Indonesia by about 40,000 years ago, the release says.

“However, findings by the SoRT Project show that Homo erectus’ time in the region ended before modern humans arrived there. The analyses suggest that Homo erectus was gone by at least 143,000 years ago—and likely by more than 550,000 years ago. This means the demise of Homo erectus occurred long before the arrival of Homo sapiens.

“Thus, Homo erectus probably did not share habitats with modern humans,” Indriati says.

The release says the existence of the two species simultaneously has important implications for models about the origins of modern humans.

“One of the models, the Out of Africa or replacement model, predicts such overlap. However, another, the multiregional model, which posits that modern humans originated as a result of genetic contributions from hominin populations all around the Old World (Africa, Asia, Europe), does not. The late survival of Homo erectus in Indonesia has been used as one line of support for the Out of Africa model.”

Source: The Jakarta Globe

Indonesian Scientists Involved in Major Evolution Breakthrough: Report

Scientific excavations in Indonesia have revealed that modern humans never co-existed with Homo erectus — a finding counter to previous hypotheses of human evolution, New York University says.

The research, reported in the journal PLoS One, offers new insights into the nature of human evolution, suggesting a different role for Homo erectus than had been previously thought, the university says in a news release.

The work was conducted by the Solo River Terrace (SoRT) Project, an international group of scientists directed by anthropologists Etty Indriati of Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia and Susan Antón of New York University.

The release says Homo erectus is widely considered a direct human ancestor — it resembles modern humans in many respects, except for its smaller brain and differently shaped skull — and was the first of our ancestors to migrate out of Africa, approximately 1.8 million years ago.

Homo erectus became extinct in Africa and much of Asia by about 500,000 years ago, but appeared to have survived in Indonesia until about 35,000 to 50,000 years ago at the site of Ngandong on the Solo River.

These late members of Homo erectus would have shared the environment with early members of our own species, Homo sapiens, who arrived in Indonesia by about 40,000 years ago, the release says.

“However, findings by the SoRT Project show that Homo erectus’ time in the region ended before modern humans arrived there. The analyses suggest that Homo erectus was gone by at least 143,000 years ago—and likely by more than 550,000 years ago. This means the demise of Homo erectus occurred long before the arrival of Homo sapiens.

“Thus, Homo erectus probably did not share habitats with modern humans,” Indriati says.

The release says the existence of the two species simultaneously has important implications for models about the origins of modern humans.

“One of the models, the Out of Africa or replacement model, predicts such overlap. However, another, the multiregional model, which posits that modern humans originated as a result of genetic contributions from hominin populations all around the Old World (Africa, Asia, Europe), does not. The late survival of Homo erectus in Indonesia has been used as one line of support for the Out of Africa model.”

Source: The Jakarta Globe

Indonesian Scientists Involved in Major Evolution Breakthrough: Report

Scientific excavations in Indonesia have revealed that modern humans never co-existed with Homo erectus — a finding counter to previous hypotheses of human evolution, New York University says.

The research, reported in the journal PLoS One, offers new insights into the nature of human evolution, suggesting a different role for Homo erectus than had been previously thought, the university says in a news release.

The work was conducted by the Solo River Terrace (SoRT) Project, an international group of scientists directed by anthropologists Etty Indriati of Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia and Susan Antón of New York University.

The release says Homo erectus is widely considered a direct human ancestor — it resembles modern humans in many respects, except for its smaller brain and differently shaped skull — and was the first of our ancestors to migrate out of Africa, approximately 1.8 million years ago.

Homo erectus became extinct in Africa and much of Asia by about 500,000 years ago, but appeared to have survived in Indonesia until about 35,000 to 50,000 years ago at the site of Ngandong on the Solo River.

These late members of Homo erectus would have shared the environment with early members of our own species, Homo sapiens, who arrived in Indonesia by about 40,000 years ago, the release says.

“However, findings by the SoRT Project show that Homo erectus’ time in the region ended before modern humans arrived there. The analyses suggest that Homo erectus was gone by at least 143,000 years ago—and likely by more than 550,000 years ago. This means the demise of Homo erectus occurred long before the arrival of Homo sapiens.

“Thus, Homo erectus probably did not share habitats with modern humans,” Indriati says.

The release says the existence of the two species simultaneously has important implications for models about the origins of modern humans.

“One of the models, the Out of Africa or replacement model, predicts such overlap. However, another, the multiregional model, which posits that modern humans originated as a result of genetic contributions from hominin populations all around the Old World (Africa, Asia, Europe), does not. The late survival of Homo erectus in Indonesia has been used as one line of support for the Out of Africa model.”

Source: The Jakarta Globe

Indonesian Scientists Involved in Major Evolution Breakthrough: Report

Scientific excavations in Indonesia have revealed that modern humans never co-existed with Homo erectus — a finding counter to previous hypotheses of human evolution, New York University says.

The research, reported in the journal PLoS One, offers new insights into the nature of human evolution, suggesting a different role for Homo erectus than had been previously thought, the university says in a news release.

The work was conducted by the Solo River Terrace (SoRT) Project, an international group of scientists directed by anthropologists Etty Indriati of Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia and Susan Antón of New York University.

The release says Homo erectus is widely considered a direct human ancestor — it resembles modern humans in many respects, except for its smaller brain and differently shaped skull — and was the first of our ancestors to migrate out of Africa, approximately 1.8 million years ago.

Homo erectus became extinct in Africa and much of Asia by about 500,000 years ago, but appeared to have survived in Indonesia until about 35,000 to 50,000 years ago at the site of Ngandong on the Solo River.

These late members of Homo erectus would have shared the environment with early members of our own species, Homo sapiens, who arrived in Indonesia by about 40,000 years ago, the release says.

“However, findings by the SoRT Project show that Homo erectus’ time in the region ended before modern humans arrived there. The analyses suggest that Homo erectus was gone by at least 143,000 years ago—and likely by more than 550,000 years ago. This means the demise of Homo erectus occurred long before the arrival of Homo sapiens.

“Thus, Homo erectus probably did not share habitats with modern humans,” Indriati says.

The release says the existence of the two species simultaneously has important implications for models about the origins of modern humans.

“One of the models, the Out of Africa or replacement model, predicts such overlap. However, another, the multiregional model, which posits that modern humans originated as a result of genetic contributions from hominin populations all around the Old World (Africa, Asia, Europe), does not. The late survival of Homo erectus in Indonesia has been used as one line of support for the Out of Africa model.”

Source: The Jakarta Globe

Indonesian Scientists Involved in Major Evolution Breakthrough: Report

Scientific excavations in Indonesia have revealed that modern humans never co-existed with Homo erectus — a finding counter to previous hypotheses of human evolution, New York University says.

The research, reported in the journal PLoS One, offers new insights into the nature of human evolution, suggesting a different role for Homo erectus than had been previously thought, the university says in a news release.

The work was conducted by the Solo River Terrace (SoRT) Project, an international group of scientists directed by anthropologists Etty Indriati of Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia and Susan Antón of New York University.

The release says Homo erectus is widely considered a direct human ancestor — it resembles modern humans in many respects, except for its smaller brain and differently shaped skull — and was the first of our ancestors to migrate out of Africa, approximately 1.8 million years ago.

Homo erectus became extinct in Africa and much of Asia by about 500,000 years ago, but appeared to have survived in Indonesia until about 35,000 to 50,000 years ago at the site of Ngandong on the Solo River.

These late members of Homo erectus would have shared the environment with early members of our own species, Homo sapiens, who arrived in Indonesia by about 40,000 years ago, the release says.

“However, findings by the SoRT Project show that Homo erectus’ time in the region ended before modern humans arrived there. The analyses suggest that Homo erectus was gone by at least 143,000 years ago—and likely by more than 550,000 years ago. This means the demise of Homo erectus occurred long before the arrival of Homo sapiens.

“Thus, Homo erectus probably did not share habitats with modern humans,” Indriati says.

The release says the existence of the two species simultaneously has important implications for models about the origins of modern humans.

“One of the models, the Out of Africa or replacement model, predicts such overlap. However, another, the multiregional model, which posits that modern humans originated as a result of genetic contributions from hominin populations all around the Old World (Africa, Asia, Europe), does not. The late survival of Homo erectus in Indonesia has been used as one line of support for the Out of Africa model.”

Source: The Jakarta Globe