Category Archives: Justice

Indonesia minister arrested over pandemic aid corruption

Yahoo –AFP, December 6, 2020

Two Indonesian ministers have been arrested in recent weeks over
corruption allegations


Indonesia's social affairs minister was arrested Sunday for allegedly taking $1.2 million in bribes linked to food aid for those hit by the coronavirus pandemic.
 

Juliari Batubara was named as a suspect after Indonesian anti-corruption agents seized suitcases, backpacks and envelopes stuffed with cash equivalent to $1.2 million in a sting operation on Saturday. 

He turned himself in on Sunday at the anti-corruption agency's headquarters, becoming the second minister in President Joko Widodo's government to be arrested over alleged graft in recent weeks. 

"That's the people's money... it's aid urgently needed to help during Covid-19 and for the national economic recovery," Widodo said after Batubara's arrest, vowing he would not protect any corrupt officials. 

Indonesia's economy -- Southeast Asia's biggest -- has been hit hard by the pandemic, and the government has rolled out aid programmes such as food packages to help those in need. 

Batubara has been accused of involvement in a bribery scheme linked to one such aid project. 

Officials have alleged that he received more than $1 million from two contractors that were appointed to supply basic food packages for people affected by the pandemic. 

For each package, Batubara would receive 10,000 rupiah, or $0.71, officials alleged. 

If found guilty, he could face up to 20 years in prison and a fine of one billion rupiah ($70,000).

After the Indonesian tsunami: Cashing in on the dead

The devastating tsunami has shattered the lives of thousands of people. More than 400 families have lost members — and in the hospitals, of all places, people have been cashing in on the survivors' suffering.

Deutsche Welle, 2 January 2019

A hearse in front of a hospital in Indonesia (DW/J. Küng)

When the relatives of the tsunami victims come to collect the mortal remains of their loved ones from Serang District Hospital in the province of Banten, around 150 kilometers from Java's ravaged coastal region, they are in a state of shock. Jackson Sinaga from Jakarta is one of them. He lost his nine-month-old son to the floodwaters, triggered by the collapse of the Anak Krakatoa volcano just before Christmas. "Satria was fast asleep in a rented villa on Carita Beach when the tsunami crashed through the building," he says. "It happened so fast — I didn't have time to save my little boy."

Traumatized and plagued by feelings of guilt, Jackson has come to collect the boy's lifeless body from the hospital in Serang. However, instead of being met with sympathy, the 29-year-old father is presented with a hefty bill. He's told he has to pay 800,000 rupiah (€50, $55) which he owes for the transport of the body. "In cash," the forensics department employee adds. That's a lot of money in a country where the average monthly wage is less than €240. Jackson, however, is not capable of thinking rationally, and hands over the money.

Family members of the victims are being ripped off

Three more victims' families meet outside the building. They've also been told they owe money — around four million rupiah. This despite the fact that Indonesia's Ministry of Health is paying all costs resulting from the tsunami disaster, in full, with money from the government's coffers. A debate ensues among the relatives of the dead. One of the people who've been swindled collects the receipts and promises to take them to the local authorities.

Receipts issued on forged letterhead

DW confronts the hospital with the accusations, and is invited to speak to its deputy director, Rahmat Fitriadi. When asked if the hospital knew about the illegal takings, Fitriadi bursts into tears. "Neither the management nor our doctors have charged for any services. We have nothing to do with these schemes," says Fitriadi, sobbing. The official letterhead on the receipts is forged, he continues, dabbing the tears from his eyes. "This is a tragedy for our hospital. I hope this scandal doesn't damage our reputation. We support the authorities' investigation and are providing them with all available information."

Fitradi says his hospital has nothing to do with the scam

Investigators from the provincial police in Banten interrogate doctors, forensic scientists and hospital personnel — and open a can of worms. It seem that at least 15 million rupiah have vanished into the pockets of hospital employees. So far, six of the families cheated have been identified. A forensic department employee and two people working with the emergency services have been arrested on suspicion of corruption. The authorities' investigation is ongoing.

Long jail sentences

It's nothing new in Indonesia for workers in public institutions to demand backhanders or issue illegal invoices. Traffic departments will only issue driving licenses within a reasonable time if you make an "extra payment." Teachers at public schools can be bribed to give out the answers to exam questions. President Joko Widodo has repeatedly promised to clamp down on rampant corruption. What is new is people cashing in on the misery of tsunami victims. If those accused are convicted, they could be facing life sentences; they'll certainly go to prison for at least four years.

Right now, though, for Jackson Sinaga, the arrests are of little interest. "I just hope that no more surviving relatives are swindled and met with such lack of empathy," he says. The Sinaga family has certainly lost all confidence in Serang District Hospital. Jackson's brother and sister, who were also badly injured in the tsunami, are no longer being treated at Serang, but at a hospital in Jakarta.

Lap of luxury: Indonesian jailers busted over fancy cells

Yahoo – AFP, 23 July 2018

Outside authorities found several cells that featured modern bathrooms with hot
showers, full-sized refrigerators, coffee makers, microwave ovens and stereo loudspeakers

Inmates at an Indonesian prison paid for luxury cells equipped with air conditioning, flat-screen TVs and private washrooms, anti-graft officials said, in the graft-riddled country's latest corruption scandal.

Jail staff allegedly took bribes of 200-500 million rupiah ($14,000-$35,000) from inmates to renovate cells and supply banned mobile phones or even let them temporarily leave prison, Indonesia's Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) said.

Anti-graft agents arrested five people connected to the scandal at Sukamiskin prison, including inmates and the warden who got cash and a pair of vehicles to look the other way, it added.

A raid on Sunday turned up several cells that featured modern bathrooms with hot showers, full-sized refrigerators, coffee makers, microwave ovens and stereo loudspeakers, the KPK said.

"We apologise to the Indonesian people," Sri Puguh Budi Utami, the director general of Indonesia's prisons, told reporters late Sunday.

"We're very sorry that we still have not been able to maximise our monitoring systems."

A former tax official now serving time at Sukamiskin was once photographed watching a tennis tournament in Bali and had even travelled overseas on a fake passport when he was supposed to be in another jail.

Jail staff allegedly took bribes of 200-500 million rupiah ($14,000-$35,000) from
 inmates to renovate cells and supply banned mobile phones or even let them 
temporarily leave prison

The prison's other inmates include a former chief justice and ex-house speaker Setya Novanto, who was convicted in April of taking millions of dollars in kickbacks and bribes linked to the national roll-out of government ID cards.

They were not among the inmates or prison staff arrested Sunday.

Indonesian prisons are more commonly known for their poor conditions and outbreaks of violence.

But it is an open secret that the rich and powerful can buy luxury on the inside, prompting the government to warn last year that it would jail guards or other staff caught taking bribes from inmates in exchange for special treatment.

In one of the highest-profile cases, a businesswoman imprisoned for bribery had a cell with a spring mattress, couch, refrigerator, television and air conditioning -- and adjoining karaoke room.

Indonesia, Netherlands to Boost Cooperation on Rule of Law, Security

Jakarta Globe, Sheany, January 15, 2018

Indonesia and the Netherlands will discuss ways to further strengthen bilateral
cooperation on the rule of law and security during a meeting in Jakarta this week
 involving key representatives of the two countries, the Dutch Embassy said on
Monday (15/01). (Antara Photo/Rosa Panggabean) 

Jakarta.Indonesia and the Netherlands will discuss ways to further strengthen bilateral cooperation on the rule of law and security during a meeting in Jakarta this week involving key representatives of the two countries, the Dutch Embassy said on Monday (15/01).

Indonesia and the Netherlands have over several years forged cooperation in these fields in various ways, including capacity building for new judges, joint research, technical training and exchanges, according to a statement issued by the embassy.

The meeting, titled 2018 Indonesia-Netherlands Rule of Law and Security Update, will take place on Wednesday and Thursday.

It seeks to highlight what the two countries have achieved together, but also identify ways "to further strengthen and develop mutual collaboration for the years to come."

National Development Planning Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro, Marine Affairs and Fisheries Minister Susi Pudjiastuti, Supreme Court Chief Justice Hatta Ali and Maarten Feteris, president of the Dutch Supreme Court, will participate in the meeting, which will also be attended by representatives from government, academia, civil society and independent state institutions in both countries.

According to Hatta, collaboration between Indonesia and the Netherlands is both important and strategic, especially since their legal systems share common roots. In addition, an equal partnership will also be necessary to improve the quality and effectiveness of Indonesia's judicial system.

Indonesia was colonized by the Dutch for more than 300 years and the country therefore has the same legal system, with some laws dating back to the colonial era.

We Built a Strong Case Against Setya Novanto: KPK

Jakarta Globe, Alin Almanar, December 11, 2017

Setya Novanto has been charged with embezzling Rp 574 billion ($42 million).
(Antara Photo/Aprillio Akbar)

Jakarta.Antigraft officials said investigators had built a strong case against Setya Novanto, as they countered arguments by expert witnesses during a hearing on Monday (11/12).

Setya has filed again a pretrial motion with the South Jakarta District Court to clear him as a graft suspect. The same court ruled in late September that naming Setya as a suspect in July was "procedurally flawed" and the charges were invalid.

Three witnesses brought by Setya's lawyers to the court on Monday questioned the validity of evidence against him.

One of the witnesses, Mudzakir, a criminal law expert at the Islamic University of Indonesia (UII) in Yogyakarta, said the evidence against the former House of Representatives speaker was invalidated by the ruling.

According to him, the move to charge Setya again in late October was therefore based on "outdated evidence."

"It's similar to opening again an investigation that has been halted. If there's no new evidence, it can't be reopened," he said.

But a Constitutional Court ruling issued this year, cited by antigraft officials during the hearing, allows investigators to rely on evidence that was used against a suspect who has won a pretrial motion.

"A pretrial verdict shouldn't hamper investigators' efforts to handle a case," said Evi Laila Kholis, a member of the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) legal bureau.

The evidence against Setya had also been "complemented," KPK officials said.

In the next days, the KPK is going to bring five witnesses to the South Jakarta District Court, whose ruling is expected on Thursday.

Setya has been charged with embezzling Rp 574 billion ($42 million) from the Rp 5.9 trillion procurement of national electronic identity cards (e-KTP) project. He can face 20 years in jail, if found guilty.

The graft case resulted in Rp 2.3 trillion state losses.

Related Article:


Law Enforcers Sign Whistle-Blower Protection Agreement

Jakarta Globe, UlmaHaryanto, July 19, 2011

Agus Condro, the whistleblower in the Miranda Goeltom Bank Indonesia
bribery scandal. (JG Photo/Safir Makki)  
   
Relatedarticles

Topofficials from Indonesian law enforcement institutions gathered at the AryadutaHotel in Central Jakarta on Tuesday to sign an agreement granting protection towhistle-blowers as an integral part in the fight against crime.

"Thisagreement is a joint commitment of law enforcement institutions to provideprotection to whistle-blowers as justice collaborators," said Abdul Haris,chairman of the Witness and Victim Protection Agency (LPSK).

He wasjoined at the signing by Supreme Court Chief Justice Harifin A. Tumpa, JudicialMafia Eradication Work Unit chief Kuntoro Mangkusubroto, Coordinating Ministerfor Political, Legal and Security Affairs Djoko Suyanto, National Police ChiefTimur Pradopo, Justice and Human Rights minister Patrialis Akbar, AttorneyGeneral Basrief Arief, and Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) chairmanBusyro Muqoddas.

Protectionfor whistle-blowers, Haris said, was important in revealing corruption andother serious or organized crimes.

JudicialMafia Eradication Task Force secretary Denny Indrayana added that his team,together with the LPSK, had pushed for a revision of the 2006 Law on Witnessand Victim Protection.

"Throughthe joint agreement and international seminar we hope to have helped lawenforcement officials understand the issues and speed up the revisionprocess," Denny said.

It isunclear if the new agreement would affect the sentencing of the whistle-blowerin the Miranda Goeltom Bank Indonesia bribery scandal.

The man whowent public with the case, Agus Condro Prayitno, a former lawmaker from theIndonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P), is serving a 15-month jailsentence for accepting a bribe in exchange for voting for Miranda as a BankIndonesia deputy governor in 2004.

Govt to retain death penalty In anti-corruption bill

Antara News, Sat, June 4 2011

Related News

Malang, East Java, (ANTARA News) - The Indonesian government will retein the death penalty in the anti-corruption bill, Law and Human Rights Minister Patrialis Akbar said.

"The inclusion of the maximum penalty indeed would make it difficult for Indonesia to recoup stolen wealth kept abroad. It is because of this penalty that European countries would not cooperate with Indonesia (to collect it)," he said at Muhammadiyah University in Malang here on Saturday.

He said however that the government would still retain the death penalty in the anti-corruption bill which will be submitted to the House of Representatives in the next one or two months for further discussion so that it could be immediately passed into law.

He said the government called on all parties including academicians to contribute with better ideas and views for the improvement of the bill.

He said the government would also cooperate with provincial governors, district heads and city mayors from across the country to improve the people`s legal awareness.

He said Indonesia is currently facing four big problems that need to be settled thoroughly with regard to building civil society.

The four problems are corruption, terrorism, narcotics and its distribution and poverty and ignorance.

Corruption eradication efforts have not been maximal but the government would continue to conduct improvement. Regarding terrorism he said that the people still continued being disturbed with bomb threats.

Regarding narcotics the minister said that people have been made restless because of the widespread of narcotics distribution. He said the prisons and detention houses have now even been dominated by people linked with narotics cases. He said 50,000 out of 135,000 people in prisons and detention centers are there because of narcotic cases.

"When will we be able to create a civil society if until now we are still spooked by various big problems including poverty and ignorance," he said.

Editor: Ruslan Burhani

Related Article:


Govt to retain death penalty In anti-corruption bill

Antara News, Sat, June 4 2011

Related News

Malang, East Java, (ANTARA News) - The Indonesian government will retein the death penalty in the anti-corruption bill, Law and Human Rights Minister Patrialis Akbar said.

"The inclusion of the maximum penalty indeed would make it difficult for Indonesia to recoup stolen wealth kept abroad. It is because of this penalty that European countries would not cooperate with Indonesia (to collect it)," he said at Muhammadiyah University in Malang here on Saturday.

He said however that the government would still retain the death penalty in the anti-corruption bill which will be submitted to the House of Representatives in the next one or two months for further discussion so that it could be immediately passed into law.

He said the government called on all parties including academicians to contribute with better ideas and views for the improvement of the bill.

He said the government would also cooperate with provincial governors, district heads and city mayors from across the country to improve the people`s legal awareness.

He said Indonesia is currently facing four big problems that need to be settled thoroughly with regard to building civil society.

The four problems are corruption, terrorism, narcotics and its distribution and poverty and ignorance.

Corruption eradication efforts have not been maximal but the government would continue to conduct improvement. Regarding terrorism he said that the people still continued being disturbed with bomb threats.

Regarding narcotics the minister said that people have been made restless because of the widespread of narcotics distribution. He said the prisons and detention houses have now even been dominated by people linked with narotics cases. He said 50,000 out of 135,000 people in prisons and detention centers are there because of narcotic cases.

"When will we be able to create a civil society if until now we are still spooked by various big problems including poverty and ignorance," he said.

Editor: Ruslan Burhani

Related Article:


Govt to retain death penalty In anti-corruption bill

Antara News, Sat, June 4 2011

Related News

Malang, East Java, (ANTARA News) - The Indonesian government will retein the death penalty in the anti-corruption bill, Law and Human Rights Minister Patrialis Akbar said.

"The inclusion of the maximum penalty indeed would make it difficult for Indonesia to recoup stolen wealth kept abroad. It is because of this penalty that European countries would not cooperate with Indonesia (to collect it)," he said at Muhammadiyah University in Malang here on Saturday.

He said however that the government would still retain the death penalty in the anti-corruption bill which will be submitted to the House of Representatives in the next one or two months for further discussion so that it could be immediately passed into law.

He said the government called on all parties including academicians to contribute with better ideas and views for the improvement of the bill.

He said the government would also cooperate with provincial governors, district heads and city mayors from across the country to improve the people`s legal awareness.

He said Indonesia is currently facing four big problems that need to be settled thoroughly with regard to building civil society.

The four problems are corruption, terrorism, narcotics and its distribution and poverty and ignorance.

Corruption eradication efforts have not been maximal but the government would continue to conduct improvement. Regarding terrorism he said that the people still continued being disturbed with bomb threats.

Regarding narcotics the minister said that people have been made restless because of the widespread of narcotics distribution. He said the prisons and detention houses have now even been dominated by people linked with narotics cases. He said 50,000 out of 135,000 people in prisons and detention centers are there because of narcotic cases.

"When will we be able to create a civil society if until now we are still spooked by various big problems including poverty and ignorance," he said.

Editor: Ruslan Burhani

Related Article:


Govt to retain death penalty In anti-corruption bill

Antara News, Sat, June 4 2011

Related News

Malang, East Java, (ANTARA News) - The Indonesian government will retein the death penalty in the anti-corruption bill, Law and Human Rights Minister Patrialis Akbar said.

"The inclusion of the maximum penalty indeed would make it difficult for Indonesia to recoup stolen wealth kept abroad. It is because of this penalty that European countries would not cooperate with Indonesia (to collect it)," he said at Muhammadiyah University in Malang here on Saturday.

He said however that the government would still retain the death penalty in the anti-corruption bill which will be submitted to the House of Representatives in the next one or two months for further discussion so that it could be immediately passed into law.

He said the government called on all parties including academicians to contribute with better ideas and views for the improvement of the bill.

He said the government would also cooperate with provincial governors, district heads and city mayors from across the country to improve the people`s legal awareness.

He said Indonesia is currently facing four big problems that need to be settled thoroughly with regard to building civil society.

The four problems are corruption, terrorism, narcotics and its distribution and poverty and ignorance.

Corruption eradication efforts have not been maximal but the government would continue to conduct improvement. Regarding terrorism he said that the people still continued being disturbed with bomb threats.

Regarding narcotics the minister said that people have been made restless because of the widespread of narcotics distribution. He said the prisons and detention houses have now even been dominated by people linked with narotics cases. He said 50,000 out of 135,000 people in prisons and detention centers are there because of narcotic cases.

"When will we be able to create a civil society if until now we are still spooked by various big problems including poverty and ignorance," he said.

Editor: Ruslan Burhani

Related Article: