Category Archives: Employment

Garuda pilots end strike

Pilots with state-run carrier Garuda Indonesia cut short their 24-hour strike Thursday after company officials agreed to reopen negotiations over pay and working conditions.

Pudjobroto, a spokesman for the airline, said he hoped the two sides could reach a satisfactory agreement before the end of August.
The 600-strong Garuda’s Pilot Association called the strike — which lasted only half a day — after local pilots complained they earned 30 percent less than the carrier’s foreign pilots.
“We just want to be heard,” said Capt. Stephanus Geraldus, the union’s chairman. “Not only are we underpaid, we’re overworked.”
“The board of directors should know all this undermines safety.”
It was not immediately clear how many pilots took part in the strike.
Geraldus said 500 initially agreed to join in, but many were convinced to return to the skies by early Thursday.

Read more: http://newsok.com/pilots-end-strike-at-indonesias-state-run-airline/article/feed/279971#ixzz1TO4ZA1MC

Garuda pilots end strike

Pilots with state-run carrier Garuda Indonesia cut short their 24-hour strike Thursday after company officials agreed to reopen negotiations over pay and working conditions.

Pudjobroto, a spokesman for the airline, said he hoped the two sides could reach a satisfactory agreement before the end of August.
The 600-strong Garuda’s Pilot Association called the strike — which lasted only half a day — after local pilots complained they earned 30 percent less than the carrier’s foreign pilots.
“We just want to be heard,” said Capt. Stephanus Geraldus, the union’s chairman. “Not only are we underpaid, we’re overworked.”
“The board of directors should know all this undermines safety.”
It was not immediately clear how many pilots took part in the strike.
Geraldus said 500 initially agreed to join in, but many were convinced to return to the skies by early Thursday.

Read more: http://newsok.com/pilots-end-strike-at-indonesias-state-run-airline/article/feed/279971#ixzz1TO4ZA1MC

Garuda pilots to strike over pay

Indonesian pilots working for the national airline were planning to strike Thursday over complaints that they receive less pay than their foreign colleagues in the company, officials said.
PT Garuda Indonesia officials said the strike announced late Wednesday would not affect its operations, because many pilots would still work.
‘I’m sure there won’t be cancellations,’ the company’s operations director Ari Sapari said. ‘Our colleagues are professional.’
The company employs 867 pilots, including 43 foreigners, and operates 364 flights daily, Sapari said.
Garuda Pilot Association chairman Stephanus Geraldus said the decision to strike was made because negotiations had failed.
‘This is a last resort,’ Geraldus was quoted as saying by the Detik.com news website.
Local pilots have complained their foreign colleagues with similar experience are paid nearly twice as much.
Garuda said local pilots were paid less because they received other benefits not enjoyed by foreign officers, including an annual holiday bonus.

Converse workers kicked, abused

Workers making Converse sneakers in Indonesia say supervisors throw shoes at them, slap them and call them dogs and pigs. Nike, the brand’s owner, admits that such abuse has occurred among the contractors that make its high-tops but says there was little it could do to stop it.

Dozens of workers interviewed by The Associated Press and a document released by Nike show that the footwear and athletic apparel giant has far to go to meet the standards it set for itself a decade ago to end its reliance on sweatshop labour.

That does not appear to explain abuses that workers allege at the Pou Chen Group factory in Sukabumi, which didn’t start making Converse products until four years after Nike bought Converse.

One worker said she was kicked by a supervisor last year after making a mistake while cutting rubber for soles. “We’re powerless. Our only choice is to stay and suffer, or speak out and be fired,” said the woman. The 10,000 mostly female workers at the Taiwanese-operated Pou Chen plant make around 50 cents an hour.

“They throw shoes and other things at us,” said a 23-year-old woman in the embroidery division. “They growl and slap us when they get angry.”

Freeport Strike Ends

Workers at Freeport McMoRan’s giant gold and copper mine in Indonesia’s Papua region agreed on July 11 to end a strike that has lasted more than a week.
“We have signed an agreement with the employees. We hope they will resume to work soon,” company spokeswoman Sinta Sirait.

More than 8,000 workers from the company went on strike on July 4 to demand better wages, disrupting production.

“Since the strike, the company’s activities have been paralyzed as production stopped. We don’t know yet how long we will need to fix the installations damages,” she said.

But the parties have not yet reached a deal over workers’ demands on salary increases.

“There will be further negotiation after this,” union chief Sudiro said, adding that workers are expected to back to work in one or two days.

There are more than 11,000 employees at the mine, according to February data provided by the company’s union. They asked the company to raise their salary as their current income was the lowest among McMoRan employees in other countries.

The Freeport mine sits on some of the world’s richest gold reserves and the company’s local subsidiary is the largest single taxpayer to the Indonesian government.

Thousands of Freeport workers strike for better wages in Papua

More than 7,000 workers from US company Freeport McMoRan’s massive gold and copper mine in Indonesia’s western Papua region started a week-long strike on Monday to demand better wages.

“We want a bigger salary so that we can afford to have a better life,” Frans Kaweai, a protester, told AFP at the site entrance.

“We started our strike from today because the management refused to agree to our demands,” he added.

Hundreds of police officers have been deployed to secure the mining area.

“Our personnel will provide security to prevent the protest from turning violent,” Mimika police chief Deny Edward Siregar told AFP.

Freeport’s spokesman Ramdani Sirait said the protest had not affected production but urged staff to return to work “while this issue is being resolved to avoid impacts to employees and the company”.

“The company is working diligently with the union and employee leadership to resolve this work stoppage,” he said in an e-mailed statement.

Thousands of Freeport workers strike for better wages in Papua

More than 7,000 workers from US company Freeport McMoRan’s massive gold and copper mine in Indonesia’s western Papua region started a week-long strike on Monday to demand better wages.

“We want a bigger salary so that we can afford to have a better life,” Frans Kaweai, a protester, told AFP at the site entrance.

“We started our strike from today because the management refused to agree to our demands,” he added.

Hundreds of police officers have been deployed to secure the mining area.

“Our personnel will provide security to prevent the protest from turning violent,” Mimika police chief Deny Edward Siregar told AFP.

Freeport’s spokesman Ramdani Sirait said the protest had not affected production but urged staff to return to work “while this issue is being resolved to avoid impacts to employees and the company”.

“The company is working diligently with the union and employee leadership to resolve this work stoppage,” he said in an e-mailed statement.

Thousands of Freeport workers strike for better wages in Papua

More than 7,000 workers from US company Freeport McMoRan’s massive gold and copper mine in Indonesia’s western Papua region started a week-long strike on Monday to demand better wages.

“We want a bigger salary so that we can afford to have a better life,” Frans Kaweai, a protester, told AFP at the site entrance.

“We started our strike from today because the management refused to agree to our demands,” he added.

Hundreds of police officers have been deployed to secure the mining area.

“Our personnel will provide security to prevent the protest from turning violent,” Mimika police chief Deny Edward Siregar told AFP.

Freeport’s spokesman Ramdani Sirait said the protest had not affected production but urged staff to return to work “while this issue is being resolved to avoid impacts to employees and the company”.

“The company is working diligently with the union and employee leadership to resolve this work stoppage,” he said in an e-mailed statement.

Thousands of Freeport workers strike for better wages in Papua

More than 7,000 workers from US company Freeport McMoRan’s massive gold and copper mine in Indonesia’s western Papua region started a week-long strike on Monday to demand better wages.

“We want a bigger salary so that we can afford to have a better life,” Frans Kaweai, a protester, told AFP at the site entrance.

“We started our strike from today because the management refused to agree to our demands,” he added.

Hundreds of police officers have been deployed to secure the mining area.

“Our personnel will provide security to prevent the protest from turning violent,” Mimika police chief Deny Edward Siregar told AFP.

Freeport’s spokesman Ramdani Sirait said the protest had not affected production but urged staff to return to work “while this issue is being resolved to avoid impacts to employees and the company”.

“The company is working diligently with the union and employee leadership to resolve this work stoppage,” he said in an e-mailed statement.

Thousands of Freeport workers strike for better wages in Papua

More than 7,000 workers from US company Freeport McMoRan’s massive gold and copper mine in Indonesia’s western Papua region started a week-long strike on Monday to demand better wages.

“We want a bigger salary so that we can afford to have a better life,” Frans Kaweai, a protester, told AFP at the site entrance.

“We started our strike from today because the management refused to agree to our demands,” he added.

Hundreds of police officers have been deployed to secure the mining area.

“Our personnel will provide security to prevent the protest from turning violent,” Mimika police chief Deny Edward Siregar told AFP.

Freeport’s spokesman Ramdani Sirait said the protest had not affected production but urged staff to return to work “while this issue is being resolved to avoid impacts to employees and the company”.

“The company is working diligently with the union and employee leadership to resolve this work stoppage,” he said in an e-mailed statement.