Category Archives: Cities

Fauzi Bowo calls for preservation of Menteng

Governor Fauzi Bowo said old buildings in Menteng, Central Jakarta, should be preserved and protected against encroachment from business interests.

Fauzi said that some old buildings in Menteng, relics of the Dutch colonial government, if well-preserved could in fact be turned into tourist sites.

“People and generations come and go, but old buildings should remain,” Fauzi was quoted as saying Sunday by news portal tempointeraktif.com.

He said that if old buildings required extensive renovations, the efforts should preserve the original character of the structure. “Restoration projects should also take into account environmental considerations,” he said.

Seawall to save Jakarta from drowning

Authorities in Jakarta will cooperate with Dutch experts to prepare a master plan to deal with the capital’s flood woes, Governor Fauzi Bowo said on Friday.

Fauzi said the master plan, which would include a huge seawall in Jakarta Bay, would be administered with financial assistance from the Netherlands.

Ben Knapen, the Dutch minister for European affairs and international cooperation, said a Dutch team was studying flooding problems in the capital and creating a solution, of which the seawall was one component.

He said the master plan would need about four million euros ($5.7 million) and about 18 months to complete. Construction of the seawall could take 10 to 20 years, he said.

The government has said it hopes to have the seawall completed by 2025.

Fauzi said the seawall would involve the construction of polders — a Dutch term referring to reclaimed land on which dykes and canals are built to regulate water flow. He said the area covered by polders would be about 50 square kilometers.

“This is about 50 times the surface of the National Monument square,” Fauzi said. “Where can we find such a wide area? We are conducting a computer simulation and the only possibility is to build these polders in Jakarta Bay.”

He said a study by the Jakarta Coastal Defense Strategy showed there would be significant land subsidence and sea levels increases during the next 50 to 100 years. One of the more pessimistic predictions suggested Jakarta could be partially swamped by rising sea levels by 2030.

The study said Jakarta needed a large polder surface to act as a water reservoir and help regulate flooding.

Fauzi said Dutch experts were in the process of conducting a feasibility study on the seawall. The study, he added, would be used as the basis for formulating regulations as part of the master plan.

Computer simulations of all development projects related to the polders and the seawall would be completed before they were included in the master plan, he said.

Harvard professor prefers Transjakarta to MRT

A Harvard University professor specializing in urban planning and public policy has lauded the busway, the capital’s newest mode of public transportation.
“Transjakarta buses are able to curb the number of people shifting from public transportation to private vehicles,” Tony Ibanez said Monday in Jakarta as quoted by tribunnews.com.
Ibanez suggested that the Jakarta administration improve Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)-based public transportation in contrast to a Mass Rapid Transportation (MRT).
He said the BRT was more effective than an MRT.
The Transjakarta Busway was launched in January 2004 under the initiative of former Jakarta governor Sutiyoso. It copies the TransMilenio busway system in Bogota, Colombia, and is aimed at eliminating crippling traffic jams in Jakarta.
Now having 10 corridors totaling 123.35 kilometers in length, Transjakarta is estimated to carry approximately 250,000 commuters per day. A ticket for a single ride is Rp 3,500 (40 US cents)
Ibanez, however, criticized the lack of gas stations providing compressed natural gas (CNG), which is the fuel Transjakarta buses use.
“I think the number of CNG stations should be added to, because [currently] it falls short of the number of the buses,” he said.

Harvard professor prefers Transjakarta to MRT

A Harvard University professor specializing in urban planning and public policy has lauded the busway, the capital’s newest mode of public transportation.
“Transjakarta buses are able to curb the number of people shifting from public transportation to private vehicles,” Tony Ibanez said Monday in Jakarta as quoted by tribunnews.com.
Ibanez suggested that the Jakarta administration improve Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)-based public transportation in contrast to a Mass Rapid Transportation (MRT).
He said the BRT was more effective than an MRT.
The Transjakarta Busway was launched in January 2004 under the initiative of former Jakarta governor Sutiyoso. It copies the TransMilenio busway system in Bogota, Colombia, and is aimed at eliminating crippling traffic jams in Jakarta.
Now having 10 corridors totaling 123.35 kilometers in length, Transjakarta is estimated to carry approximately 250,000 commuters per day. A ticket for a single ride is Rp 3,500 (40 US cents)
Ibanez, however, criticized the lack of gas stations providing compressed natural gas (CNG), which is the fuel Transjakarta buses use.
“I think the number of CNG stations should be added to, because [currently] it falls short of the number of the buses,” he said.

Harvard professor prefers Transjakarta to MRT

A Harvard University professor specializing in urban planning and public policy has lauded the busway, the capital’s newest mode of public transportation.
“Transjakarta buses are able to curb the number of people shifting from public transportation to private vehicles,” Tony Ibanez said Monday in Jakarta as quoted by tribunnews.com.
Ibanez suggested that the Jakarta administration improve Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)-based public transportation in contrast to a Mass Rapid Transportation (MRT).
He said the BRT was more effective than an MRT.
The Transjakarta Busway was launched in January 2004 under the initiative of former Jakarta governor Sutiyoso. It copies the TransMilenio busway system in Bogota, Colombia, and is aimed at eliminating crippling traffic jams in Jakarta.
Now having 10 corridors totaling 123.35 kilometers in length, Transjakarta is estimated to carry approximately 250,000 commuters per day. A ticket for a single ride is Rp 3,500 (40 US cents)
Ibanez, however, criticized the lack of gas stations providing compressed natural gas (CNG), which is the fuel Transjakarta buses use.
“I think the number of CNG stations should be added to, because [currently] it falls short of the number of the buses,” he said.

Harvard professor prefers Transjakarta to MRT

A Harvard University professor specializing in urban planning and public policy has lauded the busway, the capital’s newest mode of public transportation.
“Transjakarta buses are able to curb the number of people shifting from public transportation to private vehicles,” Tony Ibanez said Monday in Jakarta as quoted by tribunnews.com.
Ibanez suggested that the Jakarta administration improve Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)-based public transportation in contrast to a Mass Rapid Transportation (MRT).
He said the BRT was more effective than an MRT.
The Transjakarta Busway was launched in January 2004 under the initiative of former Jakarta governor Sutiyoso. It copies the TransMilenio busway system in Bogota, Colombia, and is aimed at eliminating crippling traffic jams in Jakarta.
Now having 10 corridors totaling 123.35 kilometers in length, Transjakarta is estimated to carry approximately 250,000 commuters per day. A ticket for a single ride is Rp 3,500 (40 US cents)
Ibanez, however, criticized the lack of gas stations providing compressed natural gas (CNG), which is the fuel Transjakarta buses use.
“I think the number of CNG stations should be added to, because [currently] it falls short of the number of the buses,” he said.

Harvard professor prefers Transjakarta to MRT

A Harvard University professor specializing in urban planning and public policy has lauded the busway, the capital’s newest mode of public transportation.
“Transjakarta buses are able to curb the number of people shifting from public transportation to private vehicles,” Tony Ibanez said Monday in Jakarta as quoted by tribunnews.com.
Ibanez suggested that the Jakarta administration improve Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)-based public transportation in contrast to a Mass Rapid Transportation (MRT).
He said the BRT was more effective than an MRT.
The Transjakarta Busway was launched in January 2004 under the initiative of former Jakarta governor Sutiyoso. It copies the TransMilenio busway system in Bogota, Colombia, and is aimed at eliminating crippling traffic jams in Jakarta.
Now having 10 corridors totaling 123.35 kilometers in length, Transjakarta is estimated to carry approximately 250,000 commuters per day. A ticket for a single ride is Rp 3,500 (40 US cents)
Ibanez, however, criticized the lack of gas stations providing compressed natural gas (CNG), which is the fuel Transjakarta buses use.
“I think the number of CNG stations should be added to, because [currently] it falls short of the number of the buses,” he said.

Harvard professor prefers Transjakarta to MRT

A Harvard University professor specializing in urban planning and public policy has lauded the busway, the capital’s newest mode of public transportation.
“Transjakarta buses are able to curb the number of people shifting from public transportation to private vehicles,” Tony Ibanez said Monday in Jakarta as quoted by tribunnews.com.
Ibanez suggested that the Jakarta administration improve Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)-based public transportation in contrast to a Mass Rapid Transportation (MRT).
He said the BRT was more effective than an MRT.
The Transjakarta Busway was launched in January 2004 under the initiative of former Jakarta governor Sutiyoso. It copies the TransMilenio busway system in Bogota, Colombia, and is aimed at eliminating crippling traffic jams in Jakarta.
Now having 10 corridors totaling 123.35 kilometers in length, Transjakarta is estimated to carry approximately 250,000 commuters per day. A ticket for a single ride is Rp 3,500 (40 US cents)
Ibanez, however, criticized the lack of gas stations providing compressed natural gas (CNG), which is the fuel Transjakarta buses use.
“I think the number of CNG stations should be added to, because [currently] it falls short of the number of the buses,” he said.

Harvard professor prefers Transjakarta to MRT

A Harvard University professor specializing in urban planning and public policy has lauded the busway, the capital’s newest mode of public transportation.
“Transjakarta buses are able to curb the number of people shifting from public transportation to private vehicles,” Tony Ibanez said Monday in Jakarta as quoted by tribunnews.com.
Ibanez suggested that the Jakarta administration improve Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)-based public transportation in contrast to a Mass Rapid Transportation (MRT).
He said the BRT was more effective than an MRT.
The Transjakarta Busway was launched in January 2004 under the initiative of former Jakarta governor Sutiyoso. It copies the TransMilenio busway system in Bogota, Colombia, and is aimed at eliminating crippling traffic jams in Jakarta.
Now having 10 corridors totaling 123.35 kilometers in length, Transjakarta is estimated to carry approximately 250,000 commuters per day. A ticket for a single ride is Rp 3,500 (40 US cents)
Ibanez, however, criticized the lack of gas stations providing compressed natural gas (CNG), which is the fuel Transjakarta buses use.
“I think the number of CNG stations should be added to, because [currently] it falls short of the number of the buses,” he said.

Harvard professor prefers Transjakarta to MRT

A Harvard University professor specializing in urban planning and public policy has lauded the busway, the capital’s newest mode of public transportation.
“Transjakarta buses are able to curb the number of people shifting from public transportation to private vehicles,” Tony Ibanez said Monday in Jakarta as quoted by tribunnews.com.
Ibanez suggested that the Jakarta administration improve Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)-based public transportation in contrast to a Mass Rapid Transportation (MRT).
He said the BRT was more effective than an MRT.
The Transjakarta Busway was launched in January 2004 under the initiative of former Jakarta governor Sutiyoso. It copies the TransMilenio busway system in Bogota, Colombia, and is aimed at eliminating crippling traffic jams in Jakarta.
Now having 10 corridors totaling 123.35 kilometers in length, Transjakarta is estimated to carry approximately 250,000 commuters per day. A ticket for a single ride is Rp 3,500 (40 US cents)
Ibanez, however, criticized the lack of gas stations providing compressed natural gas (CNG), which is the fuel Transjakarta buses use.
“I think the number of CNG stations should be added to, because [currently] it falls short of the number of the buses,” he said.